Welding

Welding

A1 Metallising Services Pty Ltd is equipped to carry out a wide range of welding repairs utilising the Cast iron, MIG, TIG, Sub Arc, Stick Electrode and Gas welding processes.

Cast Iron Welding
We specialise in cast iron welding repairs to a range of components including Transmission Housings, Clutch Plates and Pump Housings using exclusive welding techniques and procedures developed and perfected in-house since 1964.

Gas Welding
This is a manual process in which the metal surfaces are melted progressively by heat from a gas flame, with or without filler metal, and are caused to flow together and solidify without the application of pressure to the parts being joined. The source of heat is the oxy-acetylene torch.

Manual Arc Welding
This is a process by which the heat is generated by an arc established between a flux covered consumable electrode and the work piece. The electrode tip, molten weld pool arc, and adjacent areas of the work piece are protected from atmospheric contamination by a gaseous shield obtained from the combustion and decomposition of the electrode covering.

Submerged Arc Welding
This is an arc welding process in which the heat is supplied by an arc developed between a bare metal (or fluxed cored) consumable electrode and a work piece. The arc is shielded by a layer of granular and fusible flux, which blankets the molten weld metal and the base metal near the joint and protects the molten weld metal from atmospheric contamination.

TIG Welding
Tungsten Inert Gas welding, is an arc welding process in which the heat is produced between a non-consumable electrode and the work metal. The electrode, weld pool, arc, and adjacent areas of the base metal are protected from atmospheric contamination by a gaseous shield provided by a stream of gas, or mixture of gases, fed through the welding gun. A filler material may be used, depending on the requirements that have been established for the particular weld.

MIG Welding
Metal Inert Gas welding, is an arc welding process in which the heat is generated by an arc between a consumable electrode and the work metal. The electrode, a bare solid wire that is continuously fed to the welded area, becomes the filler material as it is consumed. The electrode, weld pool, arc, and adjacent areas of the base metal are protected from atmospheric contamination by a gaseous shield provided by a stream of gas, or mixture of gases, fed through the welding gun.